Find a PhysicianContact Us    facebook_icon40.png  twitter_icon40.png  youtube_icon40.png
   LOCATIONS & DIRECTIONS      CLASSES & EVENTS      CAREERS      CONTACT US      HOME     
ASK THE EXPERT:
Our child has recurring bouts with tonsillitis. At what point should we consider tonsillectomy?

What can I do to get rid of the corns or calluses on my feet?

Do I have to have surgery for my torn rotator cuff?


Does skin color increase
Melonoma risk?


Is it harmful to take too many
Antacids?


Are there treatments for snoring?

How can I catch polyps of colorectal
cancer early?


I have sleepless nights, I think I
have insomnia. What can I do to
cure this sleeping disorder?

All about Bunions

All about knee pain

Managing medications for the elderly

Better sleeping habits
Ask the Expert: Bunions
shemenskidpm.jpeg
Aaron Shemenski, DPM
More than half the women in America have bunions, a common foot deformity often blamed on wearing tight, narrow shoes. Bunions cause the base of your big toe (Metatarsophalangeal Joint) to enlarge and protrude. The skin over it may be red and tender. Wearing any type of shoe may be painful. This joint flexes with every step you take. The bigger your bunion gets, the more it hurts to walk. The big toe may angle toward your second toe, or even move all the way under it. The skin on the bottom of your foot may become thicker and painful.

Most bunions can be treated without surgery by wearing protective pads to cushion the painful area, and of course, avoiding ill-fitting shoes in the first place. In moderate cases, orthotic arch supports can be used to minimize the pain associated with bunions. However, in more severe cases, your Podiatrist may recommend surgical correction.

Bunion surgery, or bunionectomy, realigns the bone, ligaments, tendons and nerves so your big toe can be brought back to its correct position. Many bunion surgeries are performed on a same-day basis using light sedation for anesthesia. In the majority of surgeries, the patient is able to walk on the surgical foot while using a special surgical shoe. Post-operative discomfort is usually minimal with the typical recovery time to full activity of four to six weeks. The procedure is very safe and effective with many patients “wishing they had it done years before.”

CLICK HERE FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT OUR PODIATRY DEPARTMENT
OUR PODIATRISTS
Douglas Glod, DPM
Chief of Podiatry

Richard Baker, DPM

Michael Battey, DPM

John Bogue, DPM

Lawrence Cobrin. DPM

Bernard Coppolelli, DPM

Joseph De Cesare, DPM

Dennis Di Matteo, DPM

Joseph Domenico, DPM

Mark Enander, DPM

Robert Gibbons, DPM

Mark Kuhar, DPM

Andrew Lemoi, DPM

Jason Mallette, DPMalle

Melvin Mancini, DPM

Eric Meehan, DPM

Brian Pontarelli, DPM

Stephen Rogers, DPM

David Ruggiero, DPM

Jonathon Sabourin, DPM

Aaron Shemenski, DPM

Andrew Silverman, DPM

Linda Thornton, DPM

Tammy Van Dine, DPM

Have a Question? Call 1-800-647-4362 to speak with our physician referral service

brown_med.jpg

joint_commission_ri_goldseal.gif 
 Search for a Doctor

Memorial Info

Care New England
  Butler Hospital
  Kent Hospital
  VNA of CNE
  Women & Infants


Contact Us 

Locations & Directions 
Departments & Programs
  Cancer
  Cardiology
  Emergency Services
  Family Care Center
  Hernia Center
  Maternity
  Rehabilitation
  Pediatrics
  Podiatry
  Stroke Center
  Surgical Services
  
  View all services

Patient Guide
  Downloadable Guide
  Visitors Information
  Medical Records
  Billing
  Questions & Concerns

Education & Research
  Family Medicine Residency
  Internal Medicine Residency
  School of Nurse Anesthesia
  Podiatric Surgery Residency
 
 Follow Us Online at:

facebook_icon40.png  twitter_icon40.png  youtube_icon40.png  
© 2014 MHRI, 111 Brewster Street, Pawtucket, RI 02860 (401) 729-2000 mhrimarketing@carene.org
Site credits & acknowledgements.